The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study: A Major U.S. Birth Cohort Study from its Humble Beginnings

Friday, Mar 5, 2021

Date and Time: March 18th 2021 10:00 AM

Location: https://princeton.zoom.us/j/96894992653
 

ABSTRACT

"The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study: A Major U.S. Birth Cohort Study from its Humble Beginnings"

This talk will describe the evolution of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study (FF), a national U.S. birth cohort study that is headquartered at Princeton University, from its preconception period through development, maturity, and expansion. FF is the longest running (and only ongoing) birth cohort study in the U.S. that is based on a national probability sample (i.e., is representative of a population). This talk will relate how the project got started, how it developed, and how it has become a unique and increasingly valuable national resource for learning about poverty and family functioning, linkages between socioeconomic status and health, and determinants of intergenerational mobility and income inequality.

BIO:

Nancy E. Reichman, Ph.D. is a Professor of Pediatrics at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and has held positions as Visiting Professor (Department of Economics) and Visiting Research Collaborator (Center for Research on Child Wellbeing) at Princeton University for decades. She is an economist with a broad portfolio of research focusing on linkages between socioeconomic status and health, including studies of determinants of infant and child health, effects of child health on family resources, sources of health disparities, and effects of public policies and other contexts on child and family well-being. She was the founding project director of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a  national (and soon to be intergenerational) longitudinal U.S. birth cohort study that is headquartered at Princeton University. Reichman has been Principal Investigator on several collaborative research projects that have augmented and/or used the Fragile Families data.